David King, MSc, PhD
Writer, Teacher, and Health Psychologist


       davidking2311@gmail.com

"We need not to be let alone. We need to be
really bothered once in a while. How long
is it since you were really bothered? About something important, about something
real?" (Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451)
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Universe

Many Worlds Between

by David King on October 15, 2016

me

It seems, after all, that in this one we find ourselves together.

There is a theory in quantum physics called the many-worlds interpretation, which postulates the existence of an infinite number of alternate universes, each with a slight variation on past and each with multiple variations on future to come. It is the idea that everything that could have happened in this universe did happen in another, thereby denying the collapse of any given wave of potential in any given moment – and creating an infinite sequence of alternate realities defined by the could-haves and should-haves of here-and-now. Each is real, yet only one is known. This is ours.

For all its fantastical claims, the many-worlds theory is a real one among physicists – whose mental wrestling with the curiosities and impossibilities of the quantum world will likely persist for … Keep Reading Here

connect

I have recently found myself faced with a peculiar conflict (of the existential variety). In my heart of hearts, I have long considered myself a socialist. I say this not in a strictly political sense, but in a moral one (I would more formally describe myself as a progressive liberal). I am sensitive to the connections among us. I see them in both the daily minutia and my life as it unfolds more broadly. Undoubtedly, we are all connected. We are all mutually dependent—even at our greatest distances, and in our most desolate of separations. As Carl Sagan (and many others) have reminded us, “we are made of starstuff.” The romanticized nucleosynthetic origins of our finer components (carbon, oxygen, etc.) might be augmented only by the preceding origins of hydrogen and helium during the Big Bang. With such temporal depth … Keep Reading Here

Eyes to the Starlit Wayside: An Observer’s Cosmos

by David King on October 31, 2012

Since I was very young, I’ve been preoccupied by space. It’s pretty cool stuff, when you think about it: dark, mysterious, incomprehensible in size, and littered with little green men and spaceships and other worlds with other beings with dreams of their own – dreams of us, perhaps.

Very early on, I came to the firm conclusion that we weren’t alone in all this space. What a ridiculous idea, really, to imagine mere humans as the only stewards of so much emptiness. (To pay homage to Carl Sagan’s Contact, it sure seems like an awful waste of space.)

As an adult, my romance with space has increased tenfold.

Today, we know that space isn’t really space at all; that there is a fabric to the cosmos, comprised of dark energy and dark matter, elusive constructs that give substance to … Keep Reading Here

For the Love of Time

by David King on August 7, 2009

There are moments – here and there, now and then – in which one’s perception of time changes or shifts. Time may seem to slow, or to speed up, or to stop altogether, if even for a moment. This relative quality of time may not be exactly what Einstein spoke of in his Theory of Relativity, but in many ways, it may be more intriguing (particularly from a psychological perspective).

Moments…perhaps lasting only seconds, which provide us with an extraordinary perspective on life that might best be described as magical. But what do we make of them once they pass? How do we hold on to these moments of flow? What do we do with these feelings of NOW?

It seems that some situations or circumstances may more readily produce such time-bending sensations: pain, grief, love, awe, and of course … Keep Reading Here