David King, MSc, PhD
Writer, Teacher, and Health Psychologist


       davidking2311@gmail.com

"We need not to be let alone. We need to be
really bothered once in a while. How long
is it since you were really bothered? About something important, about something
real?" (Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451)
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Science

nebula

As an adolescent, I had a very strong disdain for all things religious. My bet was always on science, and as far as I was concerned, that meant that life had no place for religion. Evolution was my creation story; the primordial sea was my Garden of Eden. And God? Well, let’s just say I was a critic.

It wasn’t until my early twenties that I would have my first spiritual experience. It changed me, as did others that followed. Years later, when I studied spirituality as part of my Master’s degree in psychology, I would finally gain an intellectual appreciation for the important distinction between the religious and the spiritual. Although often related, each can exist altogether independently of the other. Religion is based on preconceived ideas and a prescribed set of practices. It also tends to be … Keep Reading Here

Hope Elusive: Getting Bothered over Bees & Bags

by David King on May 29, 2013

honeybee

Since this blog’s conception, I have tried to focus on topics and issues of the less obvious sort. My goal was (and remains) to get people thinking about things like time and space and what it means to be human – what it means to live in this world. I wanted to tackle big issues, engage people on an existential level, and really challenge everyday thinking. To this end, I have decidedly ignored many issues that have seeped into mainstream media, no matter how bothersome. But my motivation for this has really been two-fold. In addition to avoiding redundancy and offering something new, I also made the assumption that my readers were already bothered by all of those things. I presumed the thoughts and feelings of an unseen audience, and implicit in this was the belief that intelligence was relatively … Keep Reading Here

2012: A Year (Lost) in Review

by David King on December 28, 2012

Now that a full week has passed since the world didn’t end (to everyone’s surprise, I’m quite certain), I thought it appropriate to reflect on the year – and in particular, on something that has me quite bothered.

I’ve never been a fan of watching the evening news, or reading the morning newspaper. While I like to stay informed, I can’t stand the way the news is edited, filtered, and truncated into mere seconds of information, as if hearing that “a new study has found a link between coffee and prostate cancer” is valuable information in and of itself. Add to this the trend of running useless gossipy celebrity stories before hardly relevant local ones, and I simply don’t have the patience.

Our short attention spans have only become shorter, and they have resulted in the near silencing of real, … Keep Reading Here

Eyes to the Starlit Wayside: An Observer’s Cosmos

by David King on October 31, 2012

Since I was very young, I’ve been preoccupied by space. It’s pretty cool stuff, when you think about it: dark, mysterious, incomprehensible in size, and littered with little green men and spaceships and other worlds with other beings with dreams of their own – dreams of us, perhaps.

Very early on, I came to the firm conclusion that we weren’t alone in all this space. What a ridiculous idea, really, to imagine mere humans as the only stewards of so much emptiness. (To pay homage to Carl Sagan’s Contact, it sure seems like an awful waste of space.)

As an adult, my romance with space has increased tenfold.

Today, we know that space isn’t really space at all; that there is a fabric to the cosmos, comprised of dark energy and dark matter, elusive constructs that give substance to … Keep Reading Here

Intelligence Abandoned

by David King on August 13, 2012

Six years ago, while searching for a topic of research for my Master’s thesis (in the area of psychology and multivariate statistics), I stumbled across an ad in a magazine that offered occupational training in the area of spiritual intelligence. Although I had been previously educated on the topic of emotional intelligence, I had not heard of this particular construct. I was intrigued – so much so that it became the topic of my Master’s thesis and two subsequent publications in academic journals.

My supervisor and I were both aware of the risk I was taking. Topics like spiritual intelligence are not subjects of mainstream psychology (or science, for that matter). It is not what successful psychologists do, plainly stated, despite William James’ very successful and poignant 1902 publication, The Varieties of Religious Experience. I was explicitly warned … Keep Reading Here

Science vs. Religion vs. Our Fate

by David King on June 5, 2009

Mendel

So I return to the issue of fate, but with an entirely different frame of reference: Our fate as a species (as well as that of the planet, with which ours is completely entwined). In recent years we have witnessed an explosion of scientific evidence that climate change is real and nearing a tipping point. We also know that we are currently in the midst of the Sixth Great Extinction, the causes of which are irrefutably and undeniably linked to human behaviour. And there are a number of other related issues being brought to the forefront: privatization of fresh water, predicted increases in environmental refugees, rising sea levels, changing weather patterns, lack of commitment to green technology by major industries, oil dependency, overfishing, overplowing, genetic modification, soil erosion, etc. (and that’s a BIG etc.). It is only natural, then, to … Keep Reading Here