David King, MSc, PhD
Writer, Teacher, and Health Psychologist


       davidking2311@gmail.com

"We need not to be let alone. We need to be
really bothered once in a while. How long
is it since you were really bothered? About something important, about something
real?" (Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451)
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Life

connect

I have recently found myself faced with a peculiar conflict (of the existential variety). In my heart of hearts, I have long considered myself a socialist. I say this not in a strictly political sense, but in a moral one (I would more formally describe myself as a progressive liberal). I am sensitive to the connections among us. I see them in both the daily minutia and my life as it unfolds more broadly. Undoubtedly, we are all connected. We are all mutually dependent—even at our greatest distances, and in our most desolate of separations. As Carl Sagan (and many others) have reminded us, “we are made of starstuff.” The romanticized nucleosynthetic origins of our finer components (carbon, oxygen, etc.) might be augmented only by the preceding origins of hydrogen and helium during the Big Bang. With such temporal depth … Keep Reading Here

moon

My eyes burn. Too long have I spent my days staring at this screen…

Today I learned that my 14-year-old brother had his face beaten so badly that he was knocked unconscious—while his adult assailant continued beating him. If it weren’t for an onlooker who threatened to call the police, he would have likely ended up in a coma, if not dead. This was the second unpleasant call I’ve received from my mom in the past two weeks. The first was far more permanent in its implications, as my dad passed away unexpectedly. Lost was his battle with alcohol at the early age of 57; and found sadly was his body by my other brother, Ryan. Upon my return to the day-to-day this week, I gave a lecture in which I discussed the life of Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani school … Keep Reading Here

In Times Past, and Somewhere in Between

by David King on June 20, 2013

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Once upon a time, things were easy.

That’s the curse of adulthood though, isn’t it – to look upon the past with eyes of envy and regret. It is how most lives are played out, with one foot rising toward the future and the other planted firmly in the past. To free it, to loosen it from its grip, is to truly live.

But it is not without its sacrifices, for the past is who we are. The past is everywhere we’ve ever been; it’s every breath we’ve taken, every word we’ve ever spoken, every memory formed. We are very little, it would seem, without these pasts that restrict us so.

This is the predicament of adulthood; the challenge of moving forward in time. We are all caught in it, at some point along the way. Some fare worse than … Keep Reading Here

Get in the Grey…

by David King on June 13, 2013

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I’m not fond of the night. The darkness is withholding, suffocating, and I get lost in it – lost in the emptiness, lost in the agony and apprehension over morning’s coup. I’m not fond of the day either. It’s too revealing and sensational. Over-illuminated, exposing what the night did well to conceal. I prefer the musings of dawn and dusk; the greyness and uncertainty of twilights and daybreaks. My mind thrives in the transitions. My heart beats in the potentials. It is a life lived in ideals and in-betweens, a life lived in conception.

All metaphors aside, a black-and-white thinker I am definitely not. I remain dedicated to the grey, and happily so. Yet I live in a world of black-and-white thinkers; dichromatic dreamers and the sort.

That’s not entirely true of course. By no means am I alone out … Keep Reading Here

Confronting Concrete: The Catch-7 of City Living

by David King on May 26, 2013

concrete

I’m tired of the city. Really, really tired of it.

I suppose it’s not the city itself that I’m tired of. It’s what the city has removed that I find myself longing for. I’m tired of the absence of nature; of perfectly aligned trees and genetically enhanced flowerbeds. I’m tired of manufactured landscapes and concrete views. I miss the connection. I miss life – the kind that isn’t constantly motivated by coffee breaks and cocktails on patios.

Such feelings may come as a surprise, given my current location. And sure, Vancouver is a city with more natural beauty than most. But it is nonetheless still a city. Trees have been replaced by towers of glass and cement. Pristine bays once frequented by orcas now function as parking spaces for freighters and shipping vessels. The nature that remains has been quarantined, … Keep Reading Here

Why Zombies Matter More than Housewives

by David King on March 11, 2013

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It’s Monday afternoon, and rather than working, I just watched last night’s episode of The Walking Dead.

In my humble opinion, I think it’s the best thing to happen to TV since LOST. I may be biased, of course. I tend to be drawn to stories about survivors; strangers coming together in hard times and working towards a common goal – or against a common enemy. Perhaps it’s the complex Lord-of-the-Flies-esque social allegories that arise, or the raw and decomposed emotions elicited during extreme survival situations. Either way, it’s difficult to deny that The Walking Dead has some of the best writing on TV.

That’s right, Real Housewives of Who-Gives-A-Fuck, it’s a show that has writers.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with The Walking Dead, it follows a group of survivors in … Keep Reading Here

The Horseshoe Crab: A Case for Conservation

by David King on August 29, 2012

horseshoe-crab

When I was kid and travelled to Florida every winter, I inevitably collected a number of shells and other remains of marine life (including hermit crab shells, starfish, silver dollars, dried seahorses, and a small shark in a bottle, among others). I collected a lot of strange things when I was younger, rocks and stamps included (see: nerd).

One of the items I was particularly fond of was the exoskeleton of a horseshoe crab. I actually had a few exoskeletons of varying sizes. I was intrigued by them. There’s a reason they call these arthropods living fossils – in addition to having gone unchanged for an impressive 450 million years, they resemble something out of Jurassic Park. And their wisdom isn’t just in their age – there’s something about their appearance that speaks of deep history.

And while this … Keep Reading Here

The Prioritization of Canis lupus familiaris

by David King on May 7, 2012

A few months ago, I came across an article about Republican Candidate Mitt Romney’s “animal abuse” scandal. Apparently, he had put his dog in a kennel and strapped the kennel to the roof of his car. This had animal lovers up in arms.

My response was one of confusion: Really?

Here’s the deal – I’m a huge animal lover, and always have been. But there’s a growing problem in Western culture (and developed nations more broadly) – people are just downright obsessed with dogs.

Here’s my perspective on life – all life. I believe that consciousness is indeed a miraculous product of the evolution of the universe. For now, let’s put aside quantum physics and the notion that consciousness flows through everything, and just focus on what biologists refer to broadly as ‘life.’ This stuff, life, is pretty amazing, and … Keep Reading Here

Pieces Collected Along the Way, All of Us

by David King on December 14, 2011

I walk down the street, and a stranger makes eye contact. She smiles, and continues passing by.

Sometimes, when I look closely, I see myself as a collection of everyone else. In truth, maybe that’s all we are – pieces collected along the way.

In the last three years, I have nearly drowned in anecdotal evidence of the idea that life isn’t always what we expect. And indeed, I have had very few recent expectations actually materialize. In some cases, expectations ended traumatically, while others drifted more slowly.

But there is beauty in the breakdown, or so they say. The greatest gift of life lies not in the materialization of one’s dreams and visions, but in the amazing ability of life to show you that the impossible is never rightly so; and that dreams and visions matter but they stand … Keep Reading Here

In the End.

by David King on December 5, 2011

More often than not, the end is all we see. And who can blame us? The end is guaranteed. The end is definite. The end is always there, waiting, patiently or otherwise.

There is a lot of talk among us humans of living in the moment. It seems to be something we all strive for – some sort of golden ticket that’s forever dangling at arm’s reach, just inches from our fingertips, nearly attainable but never quite so. When you consider that even a Tibetan monk plans ahead for long meditations by stretching, you might agree that it’s time to rethink this moment stuff.

So what’s in a moment? Not much at all really…seconds at best, maybe a minute, if you can hold onto it. THIS is a moment, THAT was a moment, you’re in a moment right now, or … Keep Reading Here