Identity Formation

Self-Actualization: The Struggle Eternal

by David King on October 23, 2012

Pick up any first year psychology textbook and you’ll learn about self-actualization, a pinnacle stage of psychological development defined by the realization of one’s full potential. According to Abraham Maslow (the theory’s author), less than 1% of the human population will ever self-actualize. This is surely to the disappointment of nearly 7 billion fragile psyches…

But you see, the realization of one’s potential isn’t about bringing home the bacon. Indeed, it’s about something much deeper than that, something with much more substance – more muchness, as the Mad Hatter might put it.

Self-actualization is about YOU in the truest sense of the word. It’s about digging as deeply as you can dig. It’s about wading through all the garbage – the expectations, the pressures, the demands, the insecurities, and the hurt – and realizing the most authentic version of … Keep Reading Here

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Knowing Who You Are, Myth 4

by David King on October 3, 2012

In a previous post, Knowing Who You Are, Myths 1-3, I outlined 3 prevailing myths associated with modern identity formation. Very roughly, these myths ascribe the following conditions to knowing who you are: 1) this state requires consistent and predictable behaviour, as perceived by others; 2) this state is impossible without mainly logical and rational examination and exploration of life; and 3) this state is optimized by the commitment to a single life trajectory or career path, which, after all, typifies a strong sense of self.

As I previously indicated, these perspectives are bullshit, remnants of an immature and entirely uninsightful stage of human development. Things are never so black and white.

There is a fourth myth, but this one resides somewhere between identity formation and identity resolution. The fourth myth is simple, really. It is the idea … Keep Reading Here

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