David King, MSc, PhD
Writer, Teacher, and Health Psychologist


       davidking2311@gmail.com

"We need not to be let alone. We need to be
really bothered once in a while. How long
is it since you were really bothered? About something important, about something
real?" (Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451)
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Human Rights

The Rebellion

by David King on January 11, 2017

Rebellion

The future is not as I imagined it would be when I was a child. In the seventh grade I submitted a science report entitled Will the Earth Ever End? I’ll admit, I’ve been pretty fascinated with apocalyptic scenarios since I was quite young. My report included everything from environmental collapse to a large-scale alien invasion. I noted that regardless of what happens in the meantime, our sun will one day die out, leaving Earth inhospitable to life. But that’s a very long time from now. In hindsight, I now understand that much of my interest in the end of the world stemmed from my prophetic tendencies. I mean prophetic in a strictly imaginative sense, of course. I have always loved to imagine the future, often wishing I could extend my life just to see what happens.

But frankly, I … Keep Reading Here

By Thesis or by Protest: In Defense of Ideas

by David King on August 10, 2013

ideas

In a relatively anticlimactic culmination of a decade’s worth of education, I recently (and successfully) defended my doctoral thesis. Most of the comments and words of encouragement I received prior to the defense were to be expected. But there were a few people who, in the midst of their support, questioned this whole defense thing. Why should you have to defend all the hard work you put in? someone asked. They can’t make things too easy for you, can they? someone else suggested. I could not disagree more. If my experience in academia has taught me anything, it is that ideas should be defended; not only examined and investigated, but seriously substantiated and authenticated whenever possible. All ideas should be defended.

The truth is, ideas are a dime a dozen – something I’ve heard my advisor say countless times, but … Keep Reading Here

end_of_doma_1

Yesterday, the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) was ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court, putting an end to a ridiculous law that prevented the federal government from recognizing state-legalized same-sex marriages. Let me preface the rest of this article by saying that this is definitely a good thing, and it is a step in the right direction. Without a doubt, supporters of equality and human rights should be pleased.

Let’s take a closer look at the reality of the situation. The Defense of Marriage Act was approved by Congress in 1996, spearheaded by Georgia Republican Bob Barr in an effort to express the collective moral disapproval of homosexuality (literally). Although it was met with some resistance, it was nonetheless pushed through Congress quickly and easily, with votes of 85-14 in the Senate and 342-67 in the House of Representatives. … Keep Reading Here

Get in the Grey…

by David King on June 13, 2013

blackandwhite

I’m not fond of the night. The darkness is withholding, suffocating, and I get lost in it – lost in the emptiness, lost in the agony and apprehension over morning’s coup. I’m not fond of the day either. It’s too revealing and sensational. Over-illuminated, exposing what the night did well to conceal. I prefer the musings of dawn and dusk; the greyness and uncertainty of twilights and daybreaks. My mind thrives in the transitions. My heart beats in the potentials. It is a life lived in ideals and in-betweens, a life lived in conception.

All metaphors aside, a black-and-white thinker I am definitely not. I remain dedicated to the grey, and happily so. Yet I live in a world of black-and-white thinkers; dichromatic dreamers and the sort.

That’s not entirely true of course. By no means am I alone out … Keep Reading Here

Gender Bent and Borrowed

by David King on February 19, 2013

Photo property of Carole Moran

Gender is an issue that has long been a bother – to me and to millions of people around the world. It’s a complicated subject, and it only seems to get more complicated. It’s the F in M/F, or it’s the M, depending on perspective; it’s the T in LGBT; it’s the pink and the blue, the doll and the truck; it’s both penis and vagina, both John and Jane; it’s who we are and yet not even close, a mere product of socialization; an evolutionary relic, forged in binary minds with eyes blind to all that lay outside the box.

When I was a kid, I struggled with my lack of conformity to the male gender role and all its macho stereotypes. Most of my friends were girls and while I enjoyed my fair share of action figures (and … Keep Reading Here

Bound to Others, Broken in Script

by David King on February 7, 2013

Banksy

The challenge in life is not to give into rules and regulations; to abide by some call of duty; or to follow script. We are not bound to such social devices. We are bound only to each other, and to the moment.

To give into this reality is the challenge.

I knew early on in life that I was someone who did not take well to rules. I was not a rebel by any means. In fact, detentions and grounding were uncharacteristic of my youth. At an early age, however, I was somehow confident that rules and regulations were in place for people unlike me.

Pretentious, perhaps. Self-righteous, probably. But I don’t care how it sounds. I don’t need to be told that stealing is wrong, or that it’s dangerous to speed through a school zone. No manslaughter? Got it. … Keep Reading Here

I’ve avoided writing about the gay marriage debate because I thought my stance was too obvious. I’m gay, and more importantly, I’m a human being in favor of equal rights – and so I obviously support gay marriage.

And I do. But this debate has become a distraction of sorts, particularly in North America.

Historically, marriage actually started out as something much closer to civil union, particularly in Ancient Greece and later throughout Europe. Hereditary lines and property rights were the priorities of the times. Until the late 16th century, even Christian marriages required only mutual consent and physical union, without the presence of a priest or witnesses.

Appropriately, a verbal promise between the parties took place, called the verbum. It could be stated privately, without witnesses: “I marry you.” It was binding, legally, and recorded as such … Keep Reading Here

Intolerant of “Tolerance”

by David King on March 26, 2009

tolerance

Although originally used in reference to minority religious sects, the term “tolerance” has found broader applications in Western society.

Today, tolerance is used to describe a moderately respectful attitude toward any social minority group that has been previously disapproved of or rejected by the majority. We hear of “racial tolerance” and tolerance of “the gay lifestyle.” Websites and organizations abound who wish to teach tolerance to young people. Thefamily.org (a Christian movement) emphasizes the importance of racial tolerance for the success of society. George W. Bush urged that Americans show religious tolerance following hate crimes against Muslims in 2001. And, in case you missed it, Sarah Palin tolerates gay people. Yup, she really does!

This past week, I saw a TV interview with a sociologist who stated, with pride, that tolerance had become an American value. So there we have … Keep Reading Here