David King, MSc, PhD
Writer, Teacher, and Health Psychologist


       davidking2311@gmail.com

"We need not to be let alone. We need to be
really bothered once in a while. How long
is it since you were really bothered? About something important, about something
real?" (Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451)
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Change

How We Got Here (or, Who We Are)

by David King on January 23, 2017

Trump

Donald Trump now formally occupies what is arguably one of the most powerful seats in the world. On the surface, this may seem like it has very little to do with me or my politics as a Canadian. But when I take a step back, I see the bigger picture. This world is reaching a precipice of sorts, a breaking point, where literally everything is on the line and no one is left unaffected.

I have always been hesitant to oversimplify any social phenomenon, because I believe that important information is inevitably lost in the process. But all complexities aside (for a moment), here are a few considerations to be had:

1. People can essentially be divided into three groups: the haves, the have-nots, and the have-a-lots. Conventional thinking typically reduces all of us to one of … Keep Reading Here

The Rebellion

by David King on January 11, 2017

Rebellion

The future is not as I imagined it would be when I was a child. In the seventh grade I submitted a science report entitled Will the Earth Ever End? I’ll admit, I’ve been pretty fascinated with apocalyptic scenarios since I was quite young. My report included everything from environmental collapse to a large-scale alien invasion. I noted that regardless of what happens in the meantime, our sun will one day die out, leaving Earth inhospitable to life. But that’s a very long time from now. In hindsight, I now understand that much of my interest in the end of the world stemmed from my prophetic tendencies. I mean prophetic in a strictly imaginative sense, of course. I have always loved to imagine the future, often wishing I could extend my life just to see what happens.

But frankly, I … Keep Reading Here

For the pursuit.

by David King on December 20, 2014

shipinthenight

A ship in the passing.
A call in the night.

When I was young, I wanted to be many things. Between the ages of ten and fifteen, my career prospects included palaeontology, astronomy, marine biology, zoology, and veterinary medicine. There is a theme there, surely, but it seems that none of these early musings were of the materializing variety. My life would ultimately take a different path: psychology. But what are all of these things—these ologies and onomies? Are they the means to some end, or the goals before which we lay out some path? Perhaps they are mere products of the pursuit…

They are all of these things, of course, or they can be. They are also a selection of the myriad expressions of human endeavor. But at this precise moment in my life, I find myself more … Keep Reading Here

A Call for Waves; or, Why Ripples Aren’t Enough

by David King on September 16, 2013

wave

As I sit down to write this, there are approximately 7,179,353,020 people living on the earth. By the time I finish writing these two sentences, that estimate will have changed to 7,179,353,128. That’s about a hundred more people in just a few seconds.

There is an interesting belief circulating the world – the belief that ripples are enough. In a previous office space, I had one of those motivational posters stuck on the wall. It depicted a water droplet striking calm water and creating ripples. Below the image was the word ACTION, and below that a phrase – It only takes a single thought to move the world. This poster sums up the belief to which I’m referring. It is the perspective that mere thoughts, simple cognitions of positivity, are enough to change the world. This belief has been … Keep Reading Here

Restoring Humanity: An Appeal to Kindness

by TamilSelvan Ramis on July 21, 2013

humanity

Preface from David: In an effort to support the voices of others who are similarly bothered, I am publishing a letter from a previous student with whom I had the pleasure to associate briefly at the University of British Columbia. Selvan was an outstanding student, and recognized as such by the university via multiple undergraduate awards of the highest caliber. Yet more importantly, he is a respectable global citizen, demonstrating a relentless passion for human rights and freedoms which I had the opportunity to witness firsthand. This letter is a plea – a plea to stand up for humanity, and to take a participatory role in its rescue. In this way, it is also a plea to get bothered, and to start thinking critically and seriously about the future of humanity. I implore everyone to get more active. Please Keep Reading Here

Get in the Grey…

by David King on June 13, 2013

blackandwhite

I’m not fond of the night. The darkness is withholding, suffocating, and I get lost in it – lost in the emptiness, lost in the agony and apprehension over morning’s coup. I’m not fond of the day either. It’s too revealing and sensational. Over-illuminated, exposing what the night did well to conceal. I prefer the musings of dawn and dusk; the greyness and uncertainty of twilights and daybreaks. My mind thrives in the transitions. My heart beats in the potentials. It is a life lived in ideals and in-betweens, a life lived in conception.

All metaphors aside, a black-and-white thinker I am definitely not. I remain dedicated to the grey, and happily so. Yet I live in a world of black-and-white thinkers; dichromatic dreamers and the sort.

That’s not entirely true of course. By no means am I alone out … Keep Reading Here

Living in Change, and in Truth

by David King on December 6, 2012

change

Mahatma Gandhi was famously quoted as saying, “Be the change that you wish to see in the world.” But we have a love-hate relationship with change, us humans. We try our damnedest to embrace it, to go with the flow. Yet on a very fundamental level, perhaps evolutionary and definitely mechanistic and instinctual, we despise the thing. We try to avoid it at every turn (which is ironic in itself, since turning is an act which necessitates a change in perspective), especially when things are going well, or even (dreadfully) when things are just good enough.

Rationally, of course, I could imagine a world without change and it would be all too boring and horrible: No one would really learn, because there would be nothing new to learn from. People would never progress, or invent anything, or determine solutions to … Keep Reading Here