David King, MSc, PhD
Writer, Teacher, and Health Psychologist


       davidking2311@gmail.com

"We need not to be let alone. We need to be
really bothered once in a while. How long
is it since you were really bothered? About something important, about something
real?" (Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451)
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Featured blog posts...
How We Got Here (or, Who We Are)

How We Got Here (or, Who We Are)

Donald Trump now formally occupies what is arguably one of the most powerful seats in the world. On the surface, ...

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The Rebellion

The Rebellion

The future is not as I imagined it would be when I was a child. In the seventh grade I ...

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TRUMP 101: The Psychology of the American President-Elect, his Supporter, and his Critic

TRUMP 101: The Psychology of the American President-Elect, his Supporter, and his Critic

For brevity’s sake, I’m going to cut right to it—and leave the frills and prose for another post. After spending ...

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Many Worlds Between

Many Worlds Between

It seems, after all, that in this one we find ourselves together. There is a theory in quantum physics called the ...

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A Brief Reflection on Individuality and the Need to Connect

A Brief Reflection on Individuality and the Need to Connect

I have recently found myself faced with a peculiar conflict (of the existential variety). In my heart of hearts, I ...

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For the pursuit.

For the pursuit.

A ship in the passing.A call in the night. When I was young, I wanted to be many things. Between the ...

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Due Conservation: The Humanity of Non-Human Rights

Due Conservation: The Humanity of Non-Human Rights

This past summer I taught a course on personality psychology. At the end of the final lecture, I shared a ...

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In Search of the Point: A Universe’s Contemplation

In Search of the Point: A Universe's Contemplation

My eyes burn. Too long have I spent my days staring at this screen… Today I learned that my 14-year-old brother ...

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Principles of an Ecological Morality: Integrating Values and Ethics for Natural and Human Systems

Principles of an Ecological Morality: Integrating Values and Ethics for Natural and Human Systems

In this essay, I outline six principles of human morality within an ecological context. From nature, a code of values ...

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The Great Religion Debate: How We’ve Got it all Wrong

The Great Religion Debate: How We've Got it all Wrong

As an adolescent, I had a very strong disdain for all things religious. My bet was always on science, and ...

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In This and Every Fall From Grace

In This and Every Fall From Grace

You can try to hold on if you want to, but your grip is sure to loosen over time. Grace is ...

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A Call for Waves; or, Why Ripples Aren’t Enough

A Call for Waves; or, Why Ripples Aren’t Enough

As I sit down to write this, there are approximately 7,179,353,020 people living on the earth. By the time I ...

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Like a Cool Breeze through the Bars

Like a Cool Breeze through the Bars

Some days, I get a little closer to that feeling. Most days, however, I’m not convinced. Most days, I wonder how ...

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Equality Not Befallen: DOMA’s Defeat & Human Rights

Equality Not Befallen: DOMA's Defeat & Human Rights

Yesterday, the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) was ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court, putting an end to a ...

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Get in the Grey…

Get in the Grey...

I’m not fond of the night. The darkness is withholding, suffocating, and I get lost in it – lost in ...

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Hope Elusive: Getting Bothered over Bees & Bags

Hope Elusive: Getting Bothered over Bees & Bags

Since this blog’s conception, I have tried to focus on topics and issues of the less obvious sort. My goal ...

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To Be Cool, or To Be Great

To Be Cool, or To Be Great

In case you missed it, the CEO of Abercrombie & Fitch, Michael Jeffries, is a jerk. He was recently quoted ...

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Something Less than Decent

Something Less than Decent

We have become complacent. And in error, we desire to be content, above all else. In my early twenties, I ...

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Why Zombies Matter More than Housewives

Why Zombies Matter More than Housewives

It’s Monday afternoon, and rather than working, I just watched last night’s episode of The Walking Dead. In my humble opinion, ...

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Gender Bent and Borrowed

Gender Bent and Borrowed

Gender is an issue that has long been a bother – to me and to millions of people around the ...

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Bound to Others, Broken in Script

Bound to Others, Broken in Script

The challenge in life is not to give into rules and regulations; to abide by some call of duty; or ...

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For the Love of Time

For the Love of Time

There are moments - here and there, now and then - in which one's perception of time changes or shifts. ...

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Eyes to the Starlit Wayside: An Observer’s Cosmos

Eyes to the Starlit Wayside: An Observer's Cosmos

Since I was very young, I’ve been preoccupied by space. It’s pretty cool stuff, when you think about it: dark, ...

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Superheroes Rising: The Humanity of a Hollywood Obsession

Superheroes Rising: The Humanity of a Hollywood Obsession

Hollywood’s recent obsession with superhero movies has met its fair share of criticism. And I get it. With so many ...

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The Horseshoe Crab: A Case for Conservation

The Horseshoe Crab: A Case for Conservation

When I was kid and travelled to Florida every winter, I inevitably collected a number of shells and other remains ...

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Hope Found in Falling

by David King on February 1, 2014

falling

This blog has been neglected of late, so I thought I would share something from some time ago; something creative. This short story (if it requires a label) was written in 2001 (I was 20). It’s a piece that’s always stuck with me. Its original title was simply Hope.

Perhaps it was in the very beginning, when all things cold were warm and all things hard were soft. Perhaps it was when the belly buttons of babies were sewn up just right, when the mouths of liars were oh so tight, when the darkness of night was always just a little bright. Perhaps it was there growing so strongly in the recesses of the human mind. Perhaps it was here, in the sand beneath his toes, in the fabric of his jeans, in the air around us all. Perhaps it … Keep Reading Here

In This and Every Fall From Grace

by David King on November 4, 2013

nature

You can try to hold on if you want to, but your grip is sure to loosen over time.

Grace is a virtue often defined in religious terms, but it need not be so. I have made the suggestion that many expressions of religion and spirituality are the mere products of our desire to reconnect with nature. In its purest form, nature is grace; grace is nature – effortless beauty, simplicity in elegant design, rounded, smoothed, and charming, even when it’s not at all.

It’s right there. It’s all around us, in every drop of water, in every moment of the hydrologic cycle. It’s in the bonds between atoms, in the synapses between nerves, and in the air between each breath. It’s both photosynthesis and decomposition; both mitosis and meiosis; stalagmite, leaf, and root. It’s the ice and the snow; … Keep Reading Here

A Call for Waves; or, Why Ripples Aren’t Enough

by David King on September 16, 2013

wave

As I sit down to write this, there are approximately 7,179,353,020 people living on the earth. By the time I finish writing these two sentences, that estimate will have changed to 7,179,353,128. That’s about a hundred more people in just a few seconds.

There is an interesting belief circulating the world – the belief that ripples are enough. In a previous office space, I had one of those motivational posters stuck on the wall. It depicted a water droplet striking calm water and creating ripples. Below the image was the word ACTION, and below that a phrase – It only takes a single thought to move the world. This poster sums up the belief to which I’m referring. It is the perspective that mere thoughts, simple cognitions of positivity, are enough to change the world. This belief has been … Keep Reading Here

Like a Cool Breeze through the Bars

by David King on August 25, 2013

social cage

Some days, I get a little closer to that feeling.

Most days, however, I’m not convinced. Most days, I wonder how everything got like this; how we let everything get like this. And I speak both personally and collectively; as individuals, as families, as a species, how did things get so out of control? Perhaps it’s a vicious cycle, a feedback loop of sorts – once the ball is dropped, it just keeps rolling, increasing exponentially in speed with every turn. Maybe it falls, maybe it stops. Maybe, someday, this all ends, and the loop closes.

Lately, I’ve gained a new perspective on the feelings of my youth; in particular, the feelings of unrest and discontent with the way things are. In my relentless tendency to view all things as connected, and to advocate for the connections among all … Keep Reading Here

By Thesis or by Protest: In Defense of Ideas

by David King on August 10, 2013

ideas

In a relatively anticlimactic culmination of a decade’s worth of education, I recently (and successfully) defended my doctoral thesis. Most of the comments and words of encouragement I received prior to the defense were to be expected. But there were a few people who, in the midst of their support, questioned this whole defense thing. Why should you have to defend all the hard work you put in? someone asked. They can’t make things too easy for you, can they? someone else suggested. I could not disagree more. If my experience in academia has taught me anything, it is that ideas should be defended; not only examined and investigated, but seriously substantiated and authenticated whenever possible. All ideas should be defended.

The truth is, ideas are a dime a dozen – something I’ve heard my advisor say countless times, but … Keep Reading Here

Restoring Humanity: An Appeal to Kindness

by TamilSelvan Ramis on July 21, 2013

humanity

Preface from David: In an effort to support the voices of others who are similarly bothered, I am publishing a letter from a previous student with whom I had the pleasure to associate briefly at the University of British Columbia. Selvan was an outstanding student, and recognized as such by the university via multiple undergraduate awards of the highest caliber. Yet more importantly, he is a respectable global citizen, demonstrating a relentless passion for human rights and freedoms which I had the opportunity to witness firsthand. This letter is a plea – a plea to stand up for humanity, and to take a participatory role in its rescue. In this way, it is also a plea to get bothered, and to start thinking critically and seriously about the future of humanity. I implore everyone to get more active. Please Keep Reading Here

end_of_doma_1

Yesterday, the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) was ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court, putting an end to a ridiculous law that prevented the federal government from recognizing state-legalized same-sex marriages. Let me preface the rest of this article by saying that this is definitely a good thing, and it is a step in the right direction. Without a doubt, supporters of equality and human rights should be pleased.

Let’s take a closer look at the reality of the situation. The Defense of Marriage Act was approved by Congress in 1996, spearheaded by Georgia Republican Bob Barr in an effort to express the collective moral disapproval of homosexuality (literally). Although it was met with some resistance, it was nonetheless pushed through Congress quickly and easily, with votes of 85-14 in the Senate and 342-67 in the House of Representatives. … Keep Reading Here

In Times Past, and Somewhere in Between

by David King on June 20, 2013

green-light-1

Once upon a time, things were easy.

That’s the curse of adulthood though, isn’t it – to look upon the past with eyes of envy and regret. It is how most lives are played out, with one foot rising toward the future and the other planted firmly in the past. To free it, to loosen it from its grip, is to truly live.

But it is not without its sacrifices, for the past is who we are. The past is everywhere we’ve ever been; it’s every breath we’ve taken, every word we’ve ever spoken, every memory formed. We are very little, it would seem, without these pasts that restrict us so.

This is the predicament of adulthood; the challenge of moving forward in time. We are all caught in it, at some point along the way. Some fare worse than … Keep Reading Here

Get in the Grey…

by David King on June 13, 2013

blackandwhite

I’m not fond of the night. The darkness is withholding, suffocating, and I get lost in it – lost in the emptiness, lost in the agony and apprehension over morning’s coup. I’m not fond of the day either. It’s too revealing and sensational. Over-illuminated, exposing what the night did well to conceal. I prefer the musings of dawn and dusk; the greyness and uncertainty of twilights and daybreaks. My mind thrives in the transitions. My heart beats in the potentials. It is a life lived in ideals and in-betweens, a life lived in conception.

All metaphors aside, a black-and-white thinker I am definitely not. I remain dedicated to the grey, and happily so. Yet I live in a world of black-and-white thinkers; dichromatic dreamers and the sort.

That’s not entirely true of course. By no means am I alone out … Keep Reading Here

Hope Elusive: Getting Bothered over Bees & Bags

by David King on May 29, 2013

honeybee

Since this blog’s conception, I have tried to focus on topics and issues of the less obvious sort. My goal was (and remains) to get people thinking about things like time and space and what it means to be human – what it means to live in this world. I wanted to tackle big issues, engage people on an existential level, and really challenge everyday thinking. To this end, I have decidedly ignored many issues that have seeped into mainstream media, no matter how bothersome. But my motivation for this has really been two-fold. In addition to avoiding redundancy and offering something new, I also made the assumption that my readers were already bothered by all of those things. I presumed the thoughts and feelings of an unseen audience, and implicit in this was the belief that intelligence was relatively … Keep Reading Here