David King, MSc, PhD
Writer, Teacher, and Health Psychologist


       davidking2311@gmail.com

"We need not to be let alone. We need to be
really bothered once in a while. How long
is it since you were really bothered? About something important, about something
real?" (Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451)
Home Services Blog Curriculum Vitae Teaching Dossier Contact
Featured blog posts...
How We Got Here (or, Who We Are)

How We Got Here (or, Who We Are)

Donald Trump now formally occupies what is arguably one of the most powerful seats in the world. On the surface, ...

Read More

The Rebellion

The Rebellion

The future is not as I imagined it would be when I was a child. In the seventh grade I ...

Read More

TRUMP 101: The Psychology of the American President-Elect, his Supporter, and his Critic

TRUMP 101: The Psychology of the American President-Elect, his Supporter, and his Critic

For brevity’s sake, I’m going to cut right to it—and leave the frills and prose for another post. After spending ...

Read More

Many Worlds Between

Many Worlds Between

It seems, after all, that in this one we find ourselves together. There is a theory in quantum physics called the ...

Read More

A Brief Reflection on Individuality and the Need to Connect

A Brief Reflection on Individuality and the Need to Connect

I have recently found myself faced with a peculiar conflict (of the existential variety). In my heart of hearts, I ...

Read More

For the pursuit.

For the pursuit.

A ship in the passing.A call in the night. When I was young, I wanted to be many things. Between the ...

Read More

Due Conservation: The Humanity of Non-Human Rights

Due Conservation: The Humanity of Non-Human Rights

This past summer I taught a course on personality psychology. At the end of the final lecture, I shared a ...

Read More

In Search of the Point: A Universe’s Contemplation

In Search of the Point: A Universe's Contemplation

My eyes burn. Too long have I spent my days staring at this screen… Today I learned that my 14-year-old brother ...

Read More

Principles of an Ecological Morality: Integrating Values and Ethics for Natural and Human Systems

Principles of an Ecological Morality: Integrating Values and Ethics for Natural and Human Systems

In this essay, I outline six principles of human morality within an ecological context. From nature, a code of values ...

Read More

The Great Religion Debate: How We’ve Got it all Wrong

The Great Religion Debate: How We've Got it all Wrong

As an adolescent, I had a very strong disdain for all things religious. My bet was always on science, and ...

Read More

In This and Every Fall From Grace

In This and Every Fall From Grace

You can try to hold on if you want to, but your grip is sure to loosen over time. Grace is ...

Read More

A Call for Waves; or, Why Ripples Aren’t Enough

A Call for Waves; or, Why Ripples Aren’t Enough

As I sit down to write this, there are approximately 7,179,353,020 people living on the earth. By the time I ...

Read More

Like a Cool Breeze through the Bars

Like a Cool Breeze through the Bars

Some days, I get a little closer to that feeling. Most days, however, I’m not convinced. Most days, I wonder how ...

Read More

Equality Not Befallen: DOMA’s Defeat & Human Rights

Equality Not Befallen: DOMA's Defeat & Human Rights

Yesterday, the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) was ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court, putting an end to a ...

Read More

Get in the Grey…

Get in the Grey...

I’m not fond of the night. The darkness is withholding, suffocating, and I get lost in it – lost in ...

Read More

Hope Elusive: Getting Bothered over Bees & Bags

Hope Elusive: Getting Bothered over Bees & Bags

Since this blog’s conception, I have tried to focus on topics and issues of the less obvious sort. My goal ...

Read More

To Be Cool, or To Be Great

To Be Cool, or To Be Great

In case you missed it, the CEO of Abercrombie & Fitch, Michael Jeffries, is a jerk. He was recently quoted ...

Read More

Something Less than Decent

Something Less than Decent

We have become complacent. And in error, we desire to be content, above all else. In my early twenties, I ...

Read More

Why Zombies Matter More than Housewives

Why Zombies Matter More than Housewives

It’s Monday afternoon, and rather than working, I just watched last night’s episode of The Walking Dead. In my humble opinion, ...

Read More

Gender Bent and Borrowed

Gender Bent and Borrowed

Gender is an issue that has long been a bother – to me and to millions of people around the ...

Read More

Bound to Others, Broken in Script

Bound to Others, Broken in Script

The challenge in life is not to give into rules and regulations; to abide by some call of duty; or ...

Read More

For the Love of Time

For the Love of Time

There are moments - here and there, now and then - in which one's perception of time changes or shifts. ...

Read More

Eyes to the Starlit Wayside: An Observer’s Cosmos

Eyes to the Starlit Wayside: An Observer's Cosmos

Since I was very young, I’ve been preoccupied by space. It’s pretty cool stuff, when you think about it: dark, ...

Read More

Superheroes Rising: The Humanity of a Hollywood Obsession

Superheroes Rising: The Humanity of a Hollywood Obsession

Hollywood’s recent obsession with superhero movies has met its fair share of criticism. And I get it. With so many ...

Read More

The Horseshoe Crab: A Case for Conservation

The Horseshoe Crab: A Case for Conservation

When I was kid and travelled to Florida every winter, I inevitably collected a number of shells and other remains ...

Read More

How We Got Here (or, Who We Are)

by David King on January 23, 2017

Trump

Donald Trump now formally occupies what is arguably one of the most powerful seats in the world. On the surface, this may seem like it has very little to do with me or my politics as a Canadian. But when I take a step back, I see the bigger picture. This world is reaching a precipice of sorts, a breaking point, where literally everything is on the line and no one is left unaffected.

I have always been hesitant to oversimplify any social phenomenon, because I believe that important information is inevitably lost in the process. But all complexities aside (for a moment), here are a few considerations to be had:

1. People can essentially be divided into three groups: the haves, the have-nots, and the have-a-lots. Conventional thinking typically reduces all of us to one of … Keep Reading Here

The Rebellion

by David King on January 11, 2017

Rebellion

The future is not as I imagined it would be when I was a child. In the seventh grade I submitted a science report entitled Will the Earth Ever End? I’ll admit, I’ve been pretty fascinated with apocalyptic scenarios since I was quite young. My report included everything from environmental collapse to a large-scale alien invasion. I noted that regardless of what happens in the meantime, our sun will one day die out, leaving Earth inhospitable to life. But that’s a very long time from now. In hindsight, I now understand that much of my interest in the end of the world stemmed from my prophetic tendencies. I mean prophetic in a strictly imaginative sense, of course. I have always loved to imagine the future, often wishing I could extend my life just to see what happens.

But frankly, I … Keep Reading Here

Donald Trump

For brevity’s sake, I’m going to cut right to it—and leave the frills and prose for another post. After spending a good part of this teaching term discussing and analyzing Donald J. Trump with my students, I thought I might offer some additional insight on the madness that has befallen the United States of America and the Western world at large. 

I believe there are three primary perspectives worth considering in psychological terms. The first is the man himself, Donald J. Trump. He served as our second case study in my personality course, and so some credit is owed to my students whose thoughts and views have contributed to these conclusions. The second perspective is that of the Trump supporter, whose psychology may indeed bear the greatest burden of responsibility in this election. The final perspective is that of the … Keep Reading Here

Many Worlds Between

by David King on October 15, 2016

me

It seems, after all, that in this one we find ourselves together.

There is a theory in quantum physics called the many-worlds interpretation, which postulates the existence of an infinite number of alternate universes, each with a slight variation on past and each with multiple variations on future to come. It is the idea that everything that could have happened in this universe did happen in another, thereby denying the collapse of any given wave of potential in any given moment – and creating an infinite sequence of alternate realities defined by the could-haves and should-haves of here-and-now. Each is real, yet only one is known. This is ours.

For all its fantastical claims, the many-worlds theory is a real one among physicists – whose mental wrestling with the curiosities and impossibilities of the quantum world will likely persist for … Keep Reading Here

connect

I have recently found myself faced with a peculiar conflict (of the existential variety). In my heart of hearts, I have long considered myself a socialist. I say this not in a strictly political sense, but in a moral one (I would more formally describe myself as a progressive liberal). I am sensitive to the connections among us. I see them in both the daily minutia and my life as it unfolds more broadly. Undoubtedly, we are all connected. We are all mutually dependent—even at our greatest distances, and in our most desolate of separations. As Carl Sagan (and many others) have reminded us, “we are made of starstuff.” The romanticized nucleosynthetic origins of our finer components (carbon, oxygen, etc.) might be augmented only by the preceding origins of hydrogen and helium during the Big Bang. With such temporal depth … Keep Reading Here

For the pursuit.

by David King on December 20, 2014

shipinthenight

A ship in the passing.
A call in the night.

When I was young, I wanted to be many things. Between the ages of ten and fifteen, my career prospects included palaeontology, astronomy, marine biology, zoology, and veterinary medicine. There is a theme there, surely, but it seems that none of these early musings were of the materializing variety. My life would ultimately take a different path: psychology. But what are all of these things—these ologies and onomies? Are they the means to some end, or the goals before which we lay out some path? Perhaps they are mere products of the pursuit…

They are all of these things, of course, or they can be. They are also a selection of the myriad expressions of human endeavor. But at this precise moment in my life, I find myself more … Keep Reading Here

Due Conservation: The Humanity of Non-Human Rights

by David King on September 17, 2014

baby elephant

This past summer I taught a course on personality psychology. At the end of the final lecture, I shared a thought that went something like this:

It doesn’t matter to me if you like animals. There are many people out there who do not like children, but that doesn’t make it acceptable to abuse children, or to torture them, or to use them for some purpose. What I hope I have occasionally demonstrated in this course is that like people, animals are also individuals. They too have personalities, and by extension, they have some sort of inalienable rights that at least approximate the human concept of personhood.

You see, I have gained a bit of a reputation in my courses to present animal models of human concepts where possible. Not only are they useful teaching tools, but the feedback from … Keep Reading Here

moon

My eyes burn. Too long have I spent my days staring at this screen…

Today I learned that my 14-year-old brother had his face beaten so badly that he was knocked unconscious—while his adult assailant continued beating him. If it weren’t for an onlooker who threatened to call the police, he would have likely ended up in a coma, if not dead. This was the second unpleasant call I’ve received from my mom in the past two weeks. The first was far more permanent in its implications, as my dad passed away unexpectedly. Lost was his battle with alcohol at the early age of 57; and found sadly was his body by my other brother, Ryan. Upon my return to the day-to-day this week, I gave a lecture in which I discussed the life of Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani school … Keep Reading Here

nebula

As an adolescent, I had a very strong disdain for all things religious. My bet was always on science, and as far as I was concerned, that meant that life had no place for religion. Evolution was my creation story; the primordial sea was my Garden of Eden. And God? Well, let’s just say I was a critic.

It wasn’t until my early twenties that I would have my first spiritual experience. It changed me, as did others that followed. Years later, when I studied spirituality as part of my Master’s degree in psychology, I would finally gain an intellectual appreciation for the important distinction between the religious and the spiritual. Although often related, each can exist altogether independently of the other. Religion is based on preconceived ideas and a prescribed set of practices. It also tends to be … Keep Reading Here

principles of an ecological morality

In this essay, I outline six principles of human morality within an ecological context. From nature, a code of values and ethics may be extracted and applied to human systems so as to benefit both human and non-human constituents. The first principle, diversity, may be seen as a foundation for the remaining five. In diversity we find renewed strength and productivity across domains, acknowledging variety and discrepancy as opportunities for growth and insight. The second principle, interdependence, speaks to our mutual reliance on one another and on all life. By nature of such connectedness, we inherit an innate agency, such that all actions or lack thereof lead to meaningful consequences within the system, impacting other constituents. No matter the level of analysis, all systems exist in a state of perpetual flux. Such constancy of change is … Keep Reading Here